US Army Corps of Engineers
Baltimore District

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepares for high water at Sayers Dam

Published Sept. 17, 2018
Baltimore District dam operator, Kirk Wirth, works to prepare Foster Joseph Sayers Dam for the expected rainfall from Tropical Depression Florence this week.  Baltimore District will continue to closely monitor Tropical Depression Florence and is actively working with local and federal partners to ensure a safe and reliable flood risk management program.

Baltimore District dam operator, Kirk Wirth, works to prepare Foster Joseph Sayers Dam for the expected rainfall from Tropical Depression Florence this week. Baltimore District will continue to closely monitor Tropical Depression Florence and is actively working with local and federal partners to ensure a safe and reliable flood risk management program.

Baltimore District engineers, Brian Glock and Yusuf Sharif, work to test dam water pressure at Foster Joseph Sayers Dam as the district prepares for Tropical Depression Florence's arrival this week.  Baltimore District will continue to closely monitor Tropical Depression Florence and is actively working with local and federal partners to ensure a safe and reliable flood risk management program.

Baltimore District engineers, Brian Glock and Yusuf Sharif, work to test dam water pressure at Foster Joseph Sayers Dam as the district prepares for Tropical Depression Florence's arrival this week. Baltimore District will continue to closely monitor Tropical Depression Florence and is actively working with local and federal partners to ensure a safe and reliable flood risk management program.

FOSTER JOSEPH SAYERS DAM, Pennsylvania – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District personnel arrived Sunday at Foster Joseph Sayers Dam to monitor and prepare for the potential for the dam’s highest water levels since Tropical Storm Agnes passed over the region in 1972.

Between the already saturated ground and rain from the remnants of Tropical Storm Gordon, Sayers Dam has been holding back water peaking last week at 60 percent of the dam's capacity before receding. Given forecasts for between now and Wednesday, rain may substantially increase the water level again over the course of the week. Dam operators and engineers are providing 24-hour monitoring of the project, measuring the water level, water pressure against the earthen structure, and outflows downstream.

“We remain confident that Sayers Dam will continue to perform as designed and will continue to reduce flood risks to communities downstream,” said Baltimore District Commander Col. John Litz.

The dam is designed to hold back more than 32 billion gallons of water before spillway flowand has prevented an estimated $212 million in flood damage since the project was completedin 1969.

The Corps of Engineers is committed to ensuring local officials, the public and other stakeholders are kept updated regarding the status of the dam to ensure they can make informed decisions during this high water event.


Contact
Becca Nappi
410-251-9279
Rebecca.A.Nappi@army.mil