US Army Corps of Engineers
Baltimore District

  • July

    Twenty-five years of work at Poplar Island brings improved habitat, expanded use of dredged material

    For the past 25 years, the Paul S. Sarbanes Ecosystem Restoration Project at Poplar Island has built island habitat in the Chesapeake Bay. Since 1994, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, and its partners have been working to restore remote island habitat in the Chesapeake Bay by beneficially using dredged material at Poplar Island.
  • A facility for a dynamic future — Army Corps delivers high-tech space for intelligence command

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, is putting the finishing touches on a state-of-the-art 381,000-square-foot Secure Administrative/Operations Facility (SAOF) on Fort Belvoir that will provide the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) a consolidated administrative facility to well-equip them for future operations.
  • June

    Baltimore District conducts research on emerging contaminants

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District is teaming up with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, U.S. Geological Survey and other federal partners to learn more about how complex chemical contaminants behave in the environment to help inform future cleanup efforts.
  • Recycling a key factor in dismantling of STURGIS floating nuclear power plant

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently completed the safe removal of more than 1.5 million pounds
  • Corps of Engineers uses latest technology to tackle WWI cleanup in DC

    Crews searching for buried explosives at a Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) in northwest Washington D.C.’s Spring Valley neighborhood are using the latest in advanced technology to reduce unnecessary impacts to private property and to improve efficiency.
  • May

    Army Corps crews dredge nearly 2.6 million cubic yards of material from six Baltimore Harbor channels

    Crews finished the dredging of nearly 2.6 million cubic yards of material this April from shipping channels leading to the Port of Baltimore as part of a contract managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District.
  • February

    Pilot study seeks drinking water advancements for nation’s capital

    In an unassuming blue trailer just a few miles north of the heart of the District of Columbia, work is underway to improve the drinking water that serves more than 1 million people in and around the nation’s capital.
  • October

    Baltimore District, local first responders simulate rescue operations at East Sidney Lake Dam

    First responders and fire departments are always preparing to respond to worst-case scenarios. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, alongside area emergency responders did just that Oct. 13 during a training exercise simulating rescue operations in the event of a medical emergency at East Sidney Lake Dam.
  • September

    Sayers dam successfully prevents major Tropical Depression Gordon and Florence floods

    After rainfall from Tropical Depression Gordon had already inundated Foster Joseph Sayers Lake and Tropical Depression Florence was on its way, Baltimore District personnel answered the call to protect the surrounding communities from major floods.
  • STURGIS Nuclear Decommissioning Completed by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Team

    No challenge is too complex for this team of experts. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers team has recently completed a very complex and unique project phase by finishing the decommissioning of the Army’s first and only floating nuclear reactor prototype – the MH-1A aboard the STURGIS.
  • April

    Newest Army Corps survey vessel performs maiden rescue in Chesapeake Bay

    The Survey Vessel CATLETT crew was busy conducting a condition survey of the Tolchester Channel in the Chesapeake Bay last week when a mayday call came over the radio from a boater in dire straits.
  • Corps of Engineers pulls UFO out of DC waters near Reagan National Airport

    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, drift removal crews pulled a small alien spacecraft out of waters at the confluence of the Anacostia and Potomac rivers early this morning as part of their day-to-day mission of clearing debris from channels that could be hazardous to navigation.
  • December

    Safety exercise at Jennings Randolph Lake promotes multiagency cooperation

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers works alongside local, state and federal partners to ensure staff
  • Army Corps, Secret Service break ground on advanced K-9 training facility outside DC

    Just outside the National Capital Region, construction is underway on a new innovative center for some of the most highly-trained employees in the U.S. Secret Service. The roughly $9.6-million, 20,500 square-foot cutting-edge center will feature spacious, efficient work areas with proprietary equipment, multi-purpose rooms, an emergency medical area, plenty of natural light and superior ventilation. Its primary beneficiaries are not people, however — they’re Belgian Malamars and Dutch Shepherds.
  • November

    Community celebrates 75 years of Indian Rock Dam reducing flood risks

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, celebrated Indian Rock Dam’s 75th anniversary with a ceremony and an open house for the public attended by several hundred people.
  • October

    Whitney Point Dam celebrates 75 years of reducing flood risks

    When it was completed in 1942, Whitney Point Dam was the answer to what had been recurring disastrous floods for Binghamton, New York and other communities downstream of it. Since its completion in 1942, the dam has prevented an estimated $726 million in flood damages. The dam itself cost less than $6 million to complete.
  • September

    Corps of Engineers, partners lead Hurricane Evacuation Study for Maryland

    Maryland typically has to deal with the impacts of tropical storms or nor’easters rather than hurricanes. However, the state is not immune. Maryland was significantly impacted by Hurricane Isabel that made landfall in 2003. The state experienced substantial storm surge of 6 to 8 feet above normal tide levels in some areas and even breached the Army Corps’ ecosystem restoration project at Poplar Island in two spots due to elevated water levels and large waves. So, how is Maryland getting prepared for the next major storm? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, is currently managing a Hurricane Evacuation Study for the state though the National Hurricane Program.
  • Pioneer in military use of nuclear power provides insight on facility to be decommissioned

    Retired Lt. Gen. Ernest Graves was just a major when he was assigned to the SM-1, the first-of-its-kind nuclear power plant that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was building on Fort Belvoir in the late 1950s. At the time, Major Graves was tasked with overseeing the final stages of construction, then operating and training the staff for the reactor. The SM-1 was the first nuclear reactor in the country to generate power connected to the commercial grid when it achieved its first criticality in April 1957. Sixty years later, a 93-year-old Graves and his wife, Nancy, visited the facility to discuss its history with professionals from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and other Department of Defense agencies charged with handling nuclear-related missions for the military.
  • August

    From park ranger to chief of Operations Division, Dianne Edwardson retires with 35 years of service to our nation

    When Dianne Edwardson started her career with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1982, she was one of only three female park rangers. On Aug. 19, 2017, she retired as chief of Operations Division for one of the largest districts across the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: the Baltimore District.
  • Hydrographic surveyor’s legacy lives on in new survey vessel name

    Harold Catlett’s sudden death shocked his team members at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District. When the time came for Baltimore District to replace its aging survey vessel with a newer model, it only seemed fitting that the vessel be named after a man who inspired so many.