US Army Corps of Engineers
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  • July

    Sue Lewis signs new lease on retirement

    After more than 41 years of federal service, Susan Lewis, chief of Real Estate Division, is
  • November

    "Taxpayer Advocate” Sean Dawson, 2019 Value Engineer of the Year

    For Sean Dawson, personal connections have been the driving force throughout his four years as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District’s Value Engineer. It’s the connections, problem-solving skills and dedication that made Dawson the recipient of the Army Corps’ 2019 Value Engineer Professional of the Year award.
  • December

    Army Corps, Secret Service break ground on advanced K-9 training facility outside DC

    Just outside the National Capital Region, construction is underway on a new innovative center for some of the most highly-trained employees in the U.S. Secret Service. The roughly $9.6-million, 20,500 square-foot cutting-edge center will feature spacious, efficient work areas with proprietary equipment, multi-purpose rooms, an emergency medical area, plenty of natural light and superior ventilation. Its primary beneficiaries are not people, however — they’re Belgian Malamars and Dutch Shepherds.
  • September

    Corps of Engineers, partners lead Hurricane Evacuation Study for Maryland

    Maryland typically has to deal with the impacts of tropical storms or nor’easters rather than hurricanes. However, the state is not immune. Maryland was significantly impacted by Hurricane Isabel that made landfall in 2003. The state experienced substantial storm surge of 6 to 8 feet above normal tide levels in some areas and even breached the Army Corps’ ecosystem restoration project at Poplar Island in two spots due to elevated water levels and large waves. So, how is Maryland getting prepared for the next major storm? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, is currently managing a Hurricane Evacuation Study for the state though the National Hurricane Program.
  • August

    From park ranger to chief of Operations Division, Dianne Edwardson retires with 35 years of service to our nation

    When Dianne Edwardson started her career with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1982, she was one of only three female park rangers. On Aug. 19, 2017, she retired as chief of Operations Division for one of the largest districts across the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: the Baltimore District.
  • Baltimore District offers dredging expertise for award-winning climate adaptation project on Eastern Shore

    A critical Maryland marshland project that provides habitat for the American Bald Eagle, as well encompasses the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park, was honored with an esteemed climate change adaptation award — thanks in part to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ dredging expertise.
  • March

    Army Corps, Susquehanna River Basin Commission partner to provide data to FEMA to revise flood maps in Pennsylvania

    March 9, 2017, marked the Susquehanna River Basin Commission’s first day in the field on Swatara Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River in east central Pennsylvania, for a project in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, to provide information to the Federal Emergency Management Agency Region III that will help FEMA update their flood risk maps.
  • New deputy commander’s passion for engineering runs in the family

    When the Baltimore District was in the search for a new deputy commander, Col. Ed Chamberlayne said three peers had reached out to him personally to recommend Lt. Col. Brad Morgan. Morgan was selected and started with the district on Jan. 23, bringing with him nearly 17 years of service to the Nation in the Army. This is Morgan's second time serving as deputy commander for a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' district, having also done so from 2013 - 2015, at the Nashville District, ironically as his older brother Clay was also serving as deputy commander at the Fort Worth District (and still is).
  • February

    Baltimore District engineer recognized nationally as Federal Engineer of the Year agency winner

    Mary Foutz, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District Military Design Branch, Mechanical Section chief, received an esteemed national award as an agency winner during the Federal Engineer of the Year Award ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., Feb. 17, 2017. As an agency winner, she, alongside 25 other esteemed engineers nationwide, was a finalist for the Federal Engineer of the Year.
  • April

    Army Corps participates in "Easy as Pi" STEM event in downtown Baltimore

    More than 100 middle-school students from across Maryland learned about blocking cell phone signals, surveying downtown city streets, and using science to pinpoint the origins of an epidemic as part of some of the many activities at the annual “Easy as Pi” event hosted by the Baltimore Chapter of the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) Wednesday, March 30 in downtown Baltimore.
  • August

    2015 Army Corps of Engineers Project Manager of the Year named, led expansive post-Sandy coastal flood risk study

    Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, U.S. Army, chief of engineers, presented Dave Robbins with the 2015 Project Manager of the Year award at the annual U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Awards Ceremony, held in Washington, D.C. in August. Robbins works within the Planning Division at the Corps’s Baltimore District. He is a geographer by trade and was the project manager for the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study, which was a massive, innovative interagency study that came to fruition as a result of Hurricane Sandy's devastating aftermath.
  • April

    GIS – much more than maps

    The handy technology used to create the colorful maps that lead you to view the tigers at the zoo or let you know how much snow you will receive during the next winter storm, also serves as a critical aspect in performing jobs and communicating more effectively with stakeholders. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District applies this same cutting-edge technology for a variety of initiatives, such as mapping stormwater infrastructure and runoff into the Chesapeake Bay, delineating floodplains and wetlands, and displaying the projects that fall within its various mission-area boundaries.