US Army Corps of Engineers
Baltimore District










Viewing Wildlife

The remote nature of Kettle Creek State Park makes it a wonderful place to see wildlife. Black bear. whitetail deer, wild turkey, raccoons, possums, porcupines and squirrels are common residents. Elk, river otters, and fishers are elusive animals that can be found in the park. Kettle Creek Reservoir is a beacon for waterfowl, especially in the spring and fall migrations. Loons, grebes, ducks, and gulls use the lake and wetlands as a rest stop. Bald eagles, kingfisher, great blue heron, wood duck, and merganser can be seen year round. Ospreys are common summer visitors.

The field and edge habitats of the park are nesting spots for bluebird, indigo bunting, goldfinch, hummingbird, cardinal, and common yellowthroat. The forest of the park is composed of deciduous hardwoods and a few stands of hemlock and pine. Warblers, vireos, thrushes and other songbirds nest in the park and can been seen migrating through. Woodpeckers, nuthatches, sparrows, finches, jays and ravens can be found in the forest, even in winter. Golden eagles have been spotted soaring the valley in the winter.

Hunting

Hunting/Firearms: Firearms and archery equipment used for hunting may be uncased and ready for use only in authorized hunting areas during hunting season.  In areas not open to hunting or during non-hunting seasons, firearms and archery equipment shall be kept in the owner’s car, trailer, or leased campsite. The only exception is that law enforcement officers and individuals with a valid Pennsylvania License to Carry Firearms may carry said firearms concealed on their person while they are within the park.

Hunting is authorized in the thousands of square mile of state forest land that borders the Alvin R. Bush Dam and Kettle Creek State Park. Please check Pennsylvania Game Commission Regulations for open seasons and dates for each game species.